Recently, I noticed a few articles about an astronomical event that predicted the coming of the Messiah on April 23. The idea is sensational to me. As a Jew, I’m not picturing the Second Coming of Christ, but rather the one, true Savior from the Davidic dynasty. We’ll just have to wait and see who’s right about that one.

In fact, I have always been intrigued by anything messianic. It’s an appealing idea: The lamb will have no foe. No animal will think to harm another living being. I guess we’ll all be vegetarians.

There will be no enemy, no predator. What a relief.

I’ve devoted my life personally and professionally to helping others. It’s what I do, what I want to do, and I am glad for every opportunity to carry it out. But since I’m only one individual, and clearly not the Messiah, I cannot deny the attraction of the celestial intervention, the cosmic correction, changing the whole world all at once in a way that I clearly cannot achieve on my own.

I have a deep yearning to see humanity rise up out of the cesspool we have created.

I have always wanted to believe, as Anne Frank did, that people are basically good.

I see the Messiah rearranging the world order through the divine power of love and kindness. I see all of us becoming enlightened: shown our mistakes and given the opportunity to regret them, learn from then, and grow from them.

I watched a film recently based on the true story of an American clergyman who could not believe that children starving in Africa would not be saved, regardless of whether or not they accepted Christ. This was a heresy that had resounding implications, suggesting that all the preaching of fire and brimstone was an unnecessary device to scare the hell, so to speak, out of the parishioners and keep them in line. He was severely taken to task for this view, but it is a notion I champion.

According to countless traditions, the Messiah will appear here in Israel, the heart and soul of the world’s monotheistic religions. The prophet Elijah will reputedly make his announcement that the savior is coming from a mountaintop minutes away from Jerusalem – and minutes away from where I live. Every time I pass the town of Mevasseret Zion, which literally means, “Herald of Zion,” I wonder if and when the big day will come.

Personally, I can’t wait. The news is dominated by what’s going on in Syria and the possible ramifications that might drag nations into a third world war. Diplomacy may fail and the leadership may stumble on their own warped egos, forcing us all past the point of no return.

Let us pray that whatever happens, we’ll all be straightened out in the end.

Let us pray that love and kindness will be in the air we breathe forever and ever.